Maya Bay remains closed while several islands in the Andaman Sea remain open

Tourists are encouraged to travel responsibly by leaving only footprints and taking only good memories.

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Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) has announced that Maya Bay in Hat Noppharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park will remain closed to allow for more ecological recovery time, following the recent four-month rejuvenation period from 1 June to 30 September.

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) fully supports the DNP’s measures of environmental sustainability. Each year, the DNP closes several attractions during the low season, which allows for natural rejuvenation. This year, it launched a new initiative to encourage visitors to reduce consumption of single-use plastics at all 154 national parks in Thailand.

With environmental sustainability in mind, TAT would like to inform all tourists to Thailand that although Maya Bay will be closed until further notice, the province of Krabi where the famous bay is located offers a diverse archipelago that remains open to the public.

Krabi boasts 154 islands plus three national parks. Its other famous islands and beaches, including Mu Ko Phi Phi, Ko Hong, Ko Dam Hok Dam Khwan, Ko Poda, Ko Ngai, Ko Lanta, Nopparat Thara Beach, Ao Nang Beach, Thap Khaek Beach, Ba Kantiang Beach and West Rai Le Beach are all open and ready to welcome tourists.

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In addition, there are several islands in the Andaman Sea that are open to the public during the tourist season, including Mu Ko Similan, Mu Ko Surin, Mu Ko Ranong, Laem Son, Mu Ko Phetra and Mu Ko Adang – Rawi. Several islands in the Gulf of Thailand also remain open.

While holidaying in Thailand, at beach destinations or elsewhere, TAT would like to call on all tourists, local and international, to travel responsibly by leaving only footprints and taking only good memories. This is part of the marine environment and ocean conservation efforts, as well as the rescue of imperilled marine animals that are most at risk from plastic not just in Thailand, but worldwide.